Celtic Myth Show News

Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside

“The Detectorists” inspire find of Medieval Manx Ring

Mr Graham discovers the ring in a field - Treasure Hunter
Mr Graham discovers the ring in a field

A silver medieval ring thought to be up to 600 years old has been unearthed by a man who took up metal detecting after watching The Detectorists, a TV sitcom reports the BBC.

The gold-gilded ring was found by Gordon Graham in a field in the north of the Isle of Man. Archaeologists believe the piece, which is engraved with geometric shapes, dates from between 1400 and 1500 AD.

An inquest hearing at Douglas Courthouse declared the ring can be officially classed as treasure. Allison Fox, a curator of archaeology at Manx National Heritage, said it may date back to the time when the first Manx laws were written, in the 1400s.

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Northumberlandia, the Lady of the North

Northumberlandia - Lady of the North, Earth Sculpture
Northumberlandia, Lady of the North

Northumberlandia (the “Lady of the North”) is a huge land sculpture in the shape of a reclining female figure, which was completed in 2012, near Cramlington, Northumberland, northern England.

Made of 1.5 million tonnes of earth from neighbouring Shotton Surface Mine, it is 34 metres (112 feet) high and 400 metres (1,300 feet) long, set in a 19 hectares (47 acres) public park. Its creators claim that it is the largest land sculpture in female form in the world.

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Ritual Spear Killing of Warrior on 2-horse Chariot

Two Horse Chariot - ritual spear killing
Two horse-chariot, Independent

Ritual Spear Killing at Pocklington?

Two of the most bizarre prehistoric human burials and ritual killings ever found in Britain have been discovered by archaeologists in Yorkshire, reported the Independent.

Excavations near the town of Pocklington have unearthed a pair of mysterious 3rd century BC Iron Age graves containing the skeletons of potentially high status individuals whose dispatch to the next world had featured some very unusual rituals, including possible vampire-killing ones.

The archaeological investigation has revealed that one individual – a warrior aged between 17 and 25 – may have been “killed” twice, or even three times.

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Another Writer’s Journey – Gary’s Little Biographical Story

ManonBeachPlease accept my apologies for writing about myself. I generally try and avoid this as I feel I am nowhere near as important as the stories I tell (and those that we tell as far as the Celtic Myth Podshow is concerned). That having been said, let’s plunge on in!

When I moved from Primary School to Secondary school (after the now legendary 11+ examination), one of my favourite lessons was the English class. At 11 years old I was far too young to understand much about Grammar or story/poem analysis, but I loved the act of creation involved in summoning imagery and meaning from words. Plain and simple words that when strung together could create pictures in my mind and feelings in my chest.

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Excalibur – Enchanted Sword of Arthurian legend

The Name “Excalibur” was first used for King Arthur’s sword by the French Romancers. It was not the famous “Sword in the Stone” (which broke in battle), but a second sword acquired by the King through the intercession of his druidic advisor, Merddyn (Merlin). Worried that Arthur would fall in battle, Merlin took the King to a magical lake where a mysterious hand thrust itself up from the water, holding aloft a magnificent sword.

It was the Lady of the Lake offering Arthur a magic unbreakable blade, fashioned by an Avalonian elf smith, along with a scabbard which would protect him as long as he wore it.

Excalibur Stolen by Morgan le Fay

Towards the end of his reign, during the troubled times of Medrod’s rebellion, Excalibur was stolen by Arthur’s wicked half-sister, Morgan le Fay. Though it was recovered, the scabbard was lost forever. Thus Arthur was mortally wounded at the Battle of Camlann. The King then instructed Bedwyr (or Girflet) to return Excalibur to the lake from whence it came.

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Between Kettles and Cooking Spits at the Celtic Museum in Hochdorf

"Between Kettles and Cooking-spits" - Nutrition with the Celts - Celtic Museum

“Between Kettles and Cooking-spits” – Nutrition with the Celts

From April 28 to September 2, 2018, the Celtic Museum Hochdorf / Enz is holding a special exhibition about Nutrition among the Celts called ‘Between Kettles and Cooking Spits’.

If you believe Greek historians, then you would think that lavish feasts in the life of the Celts were the order of the day two thousand years ago. Even if only a few of these descriptions have been handed down, our image of ever-celebrating and miserable barbarians have left their mark on us to this day.

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Australian Archaeologists excavate Cornish Barrow

An Archaeologist at The Australian National University (ANU) has discovered a prehistoric Bronze-Age barrow, or burial mound, on a hill in Cornwall and is about to start excavating the untouched site which overlooks the English Channel reported the Archaeology News network in April this year.

The site dates back to around 2,000 BC and was discovered by chance when ANU Archaeologist Dr Catherine Frieman, who was conducting geophysical surveys of a known site outside the village of Looe in Cornwall, was approached by a farmer about a possible site in a neighbouring field.

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Celtic Storytelling with Cath Little in Frome


Arthur & Guinevere - Celtic Storytellin in Frome
Frome’s storytelling club, Mr Rook’s Speak Easy continues its season of Celtic-themed evenings with a full-length performance from Welsh storyteller Cath Little on Thursday 29th March.

Ancient Celtic Storytelling Comes to Rook Lane Chapel

They have created a programme of shows based on Celtic mythology and folklore with Cardiff-based teller Cath Little telling the story of Enid and Geraint which comes from The Mabinogion, a collection of the oldest stories of Wales which go back to at least to the fourteenth century though parts may be older.

This enchanting retelling of an old British Wonder Tale is from the court of Arthur and Gwenhwyfar at Caerleon. It is a story that weaves between the known and the unknown worlds – a story that travels from the Forest of Dean to Cardiff, through the Hedge of Mists and all the way to the magical Apple Orchard of Annwn. Enid and Geraint meet and fall in love in a Cardiff long ago. But once they are married, their troubles begin. Together they travel through the dangerous world. They face monsters on their road through the dark woods and they battle with the doubts and fears in their own too human hearts.

Enid and Geraint by Cath Little at Rook Lane Chapel, Bath Street, Thursday 29 March at 7.30pm and is suitable for ages 14+. For more details find Mr Rook’s Speak Easy on Facebook.

Remains of an Iron Age Feast found on Orkney

(Kirsty Smith, via Wikimedia Commons) - Uron Age Feast

(Kirsty Smith, via Wikimedia Commons)

Archaeologists have identified the site of a huge Iron Age feast on Orkney where more than 10,000 animals were cooked and eaten in a vast cliff top celebration.

Tests have shown that horses, cattle, red deer and otters were on the menu at the gathering above Windwick Bay, South Ronaldsay, more than 1,700 years ago.

Archaeologists from the University of the Highlands and Islands have been working at The Cairns for several years.

A large number of jewellery fragments and tools have already been discovered at the site, where the remains of an Iron Age broch and metalworking site can be found, with recent radiocarbon tests carried out at a midden – or rubbish tip – nearby.

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Bronze Age Round House at Must Farm

Must Farm will be in list of Top Historical Sites


Final press visit to Must Farm bronze age ssite EMN-160713-130720009

Final press visit to Must Farm bronze age ssite EMN-160713-130720009

A prehistoric site in Whittlesey has been named as one of the 100 sites which best represent history in England reports Petersboroough Today. Bronze age settlement Must Farm, which saw perfectly preserved 3,000 year-old round houses discovered in a clay pit, has been selected in the A History of England in 100 Places campaign.

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