Celtic Myth Show News

Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside

Month: March 2016

St. Patrick's Day - http://roble.pntic.mec.es/ncos0003/stpatrickjquizmultiplechoiceimage.htm

Saint Patrick’s Life – the facts and the stories


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Saint Patrick (ca. 390-460) is revered as patron of Ireland and, of course, he has come to be associated with parades and a lot of mischief associated with alcohol. No one would prohibit the Irish their day. Mayor Richard Daley used to say,

in Chicago on St. Patrick’s Day, everyone is Irish or wishes they were.

But let’s leave some of that malarkey aside as unworthy of his dignity. In lives of the saints, Patrick is called the Enlightener of Ireland and we are right to praise his memory says Father Gabriel Rochelle in the Las Cruces Sun-News.

But was Saint Patrick Irish?

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Inaugural Lafayette Celtic Festival features blend of Celtic and Cajun music


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Crawfish and Guinness, whiskey and cook-offs, Irish and Cajun music — what do they have in common asks the Acadiana Advocate? The answer lies deep in the heart of Cajun country this weekend as Lafayette prepares to host the inaugural Celtic Bayou Festival. The Lafayette Celtic Festival celebrates all aspects of Celtic and Irish American culture as well as the rich Acadian culture of Louisiana.

The festival will take place Friday and Saturday at Warehouse on 535 Garfield St. in Lafayette. According to husband and wife team Tony and Sheila Davoren, the creative forces behind the festival, Lafayette’s enthusiasm for world music makes it the perfect venue. Sheila Davoren said:

The cultures are similar — the music, the dancing, the storytelling and the sheer joy of life — so our festival has a modern twist, and incorporates both traditions.

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Death-of-Arthur

Is Bardsey Island the mystical Island of Avalon?


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An apple found nowhere else in the world has been discovered growing on a Welsh holy island. The variety of apple – believed to date back to the 13th Century when it was grown by monks – was spotted on remote Bardsey Island.

Wales displays two prominent peninsulas: Llyn in the North and Pembroke in the South. Between them is the broad sweep of Cardigan Bay. Two miles out to sea off the tip of the Llyn Peninsula lies Bardsey Island (Welsh name Ynys Enlli).

Bardsey Island has long been associated with religious activity. Pre-Roman Celts visited the island to pray and often to die on this most western isle as they followed the setting sun. During early Christian times Bardsey Island was a place of pilgrimage. There is a pilgrim’s route along the North Wales coast with a string of churches built along the way. Indeed three trips to Bardsey was considered equal to a pilgrimage to Rome. Anybody buried on Bardsey was guaranteed eternal salvation.

Dr Joan Morgan – one of the world’s leading experts on apples – said the apple was the only one of its variety in the world.

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