Celtic Myth Show News

Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside

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Excalibur – Enchanted Sword of Arthurian legend

The Name “Excalibur” was first used for King Arthur’s sword by the French Romancers. It was not the famous “Sword in the Stone” (which broke in battle), but a second sword acquired by the King through the intercession of his druidic advisor, Merddyn (Merlin). Worried that Arthur would fall in battle, Merlin took the King to a magical lake where a mysterious hand thrust itself up from the water, holding aloft a magnificent sword.

It was the Lady of the Lake offering Arthur a magic unbreakable blade, fashioned by an Avalonian elf smith, along with a scabbard which would protect him as long as he wore it.

Excalibur Stolen by Morgan le Fay

Towards the end of his reign, during the troubled times of Medrod’s rebellion, Excalibur was stolen by Arthur’s wicked half-sister, Morgan le Fay. Though it was recovered, the scabbard was lost forever. Thus Arthur was mortally wounded at the Battle of Camlann. The King then instructed Bedwyr (or Girflet) to return Excalibur to the lake from whence it came.

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Celtic Storytelling with Cath Little in Frome


Arthur & Guinevere - Celtic Storytellin in Frome
Frome’s storytelling club, Mr Rook’s Speak Easy continues its season of Celtic-themed evenings with a full-length performance from Welsh storyteller Cath Little on Thursday 29th March.

Ancient Celtic Storytelling Comes to Rook Lane Chapel

They have created a programme of shows based on Celtic mythology and folklore with Cardiff-based teller Cath Little telling the story of Enid and Geraint which comes from The Mabinogion, a collection of the oldest stories of Wales which go back to at least to the fourteenth century though parts may be older.

This enchanting retelling of an old British Wonder Tale is from the court of Arthur and Gwenhwyfar at Caerleon. It is a story that weaves between the known and the unknown worlds – a story that travels from the Forest of Dean to Cardiff, through the Hedge of Mists and all the way to the magical Apple Orchard of Annwn. Enid and Geraint meet and fall in love in a Cardiff long ago. But once they are married, their troubles begin. Together they travel through the dangerous world. They face monsters on their road through the dark woods and they battle with the doubts and fears in their own too human hearts.

Enid and Geraint by Cath Little at Rook Lane Chapel, Bath Street, Thursday 29 March at 7.30pm and is suitable for ages 14+. For more details find Mr Rook’s Speak Easy on Facebook.

Remains of an Iron Age Feast found on Orkney

(Kirsty Smith, via Wikimedia Commons) - Uron Age Feast

(Kirsty Smith, via Wikimedia Commons)

Archaeologists have identified the site of a huge Iron Age feast on Orkney where more than 10,000 animals were cooked and eaten in a vast cliff top celebration.

Tests have shown that horses, cattle, red deer and otters were on the menu at the gathering above Windwick Bay, South Ronaldsay, more than 1,700 years ago.

Archaeologists from the University of the Highlands and Islands have been working at The Cairns for several years.

A large number of jewellery fragments and tools have already been discovered at the site, where the remains of an Iron Age broch and metalworking site can be found, with recent radiocarbon tests carried out at a midden – or rubbish tip – nearby.

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Bronze Age Round House at Must Farm

Must Farm will be in list of Top Historical Sites


Final press visit to Must Farm bronze age ssite EMN-160713-130720009

Final press visit to Must Farm bronze age ssite EMN-160713-130720009

A prehistoric site in Whittlesey has been named as one of the 100 sites which best represent history in England reports Petersboroough Today. Bronze age settlement Must Farm, which saw perfectly preserved 3,000 year-old round houses discovered in a clay pit, has been selected in the A History of England in 100 Places campaign.

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Major housing development halted due to massive late Iron Age archaeological find

Remains of a prehistoric and late Iron Age settlement near North Petherton in Somerset have halted a major housing development. Archaeologists have discovered a series of 18 trenches dating back to Triassic, late Iron Age and early Roman periods on land off Newton Road earmarked for 140 homes.

Sedgemoor District Council turned down the plan due to a lack of information that

“the development would not have a significant adverse impact on the surrounding archaeology.”

Gladman Developments, which is behind the proposal, has appealed the decision and a five-day planning inquiry will be heard at the council’s headquarters starting on March 20.

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Welsh government wants to persuade people to speak Welsh Language

People need to be persuaded to speak Welsh, not forced, the first minister has said, after his government was urged to set a better example the BBC reported. Cymdeithas yr Iaith Gymraeg said just 12% of assembly debate since May 2016 election had been in Welsh.

Carwyn Jones told BBC Radio Cymru he thought a question should be answered in the language it was asked. He said most voters in his Bridgend seat did not speak Welsh and he needed to communicate directly with them.

  • Plan for 600 more Welsh teachers by 2021
  • Welsh heartlands ‘need vibrant economy’
  • Welsh language suffered ‘lost decade’
  • 1m Welsh speakers plan ‘lacks clarity’

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Is this one of the four islands of the Tuatha De Danaan?


Atlantis - Submerged undersea island

Prehistoric land under the sea

The Tuatha Dé Danann are known in Celtic mythology are the children of the goddess Danu, and are the Irish gods, progenitors of the Sidhe, the Fey folk who retreated to dwell uner the Mounds, that some call the Hollow Hills. In the Lebor Gabála Érenn they are said to have originated from four magical islands to the north of Ireland. In Lady Gregory’s translation we read:

It was from the north they came; and in the place they came from they had four cities, where they fought their battle for learning: great Falias, and shining Gorias, and Finias, and rich Murias that lay to the south. And in those cities they had four wise men to teach their young men skill and knowledge and perfect wisdom: Senias in Murias; and Arias, the fair-haired poet, in Finias; and Urias of the noble nature in Gorias; and Morias in Falias itself.

It’s remarkable how close the mythological ‘history’ is to this recent discovery in the north Atlantic Sea. The following report comes from BBC Northern Ireland back in 2009.

It’s a landscape no human has even seen. And those who live right beside it had no idea it even existed. Deep below the sea, off the north coast of Northern Ireland, a dramatic geological mystery has been discovered.

Huge cliffs, vast basins and plateaus, a lake and even rivers have been found. But so far no-one is certain what caused them to end up like this deep under the sea. The discovery was made when the seabed was being surveyed to update old Admiralty charts, drawn up in the mid-1800s.

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14,000-year-old settlement and hunting kit found in Scotland – repost

Scotland’s oldest settlement, dating back 14,000 years, was near Biggar, in South Lanarkshire, archaeologists say. The site may have been a camp used by hunters following migrating herds of reindeer or wild horses across plains that are now covered by the North Sea.

Its discovery by the Biggar Archeology Group means humans have lived in Scotland for 3,000 years longer than previously thought. Until now the earliest evidence of human habitation in the country was at Cramond, near Edinburgh, which had been radiocarbon-dated to about 8400 BCE.

A large scattering of flints was first found in the field near Biggar a few years ago but the site was initially thought to be late Neolithic and was later classified as an Iron Age settlement after radiocarbon dating of charcoal found there. However, recent analysis of more of the flints revealed that they were from the end of the Upper Palaeolithic period, 14,000 years ago.

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Aberdeen dig reveals 15,000 year-old Scottish artefacts

Artefacts dug up during excavations on the Aberdeen bypass have revealed glimpses into the last 15,000 years in the North-east – and raised questions over the area’s past.

A number of “fascinating discoveries” have been uncovered during archaeological works carried out during the construction of the project. These have included Roman bread ovens, prehistoric roundhouses and a cremation complex.

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Beachy Head

The Beachy Head Lady in Iron Age Britain

Thanks to the wonderful Way Back machine, we have managed to recover another of the posts that we lost with our database crash. Please enjoy.

An exhibition exploring the origins of ancient skeletons in Sussex, including a woman from sub-Saharan Africa buried in Roman times, opened reported the BBC in Feb 2014. The face of the so-called Beachy Head Lady was recreated using craniofacial reconstruction.

Eastbourne Borough Council’s museum service was awarded a grant of £72,000 by the Heritage Lottery Fund for the Eastbourne Ancestors project. The aim was to identify the gender and age of each skeleton in its collection.

Detailed scientific analysis of more than 300 skeletons of people who lived in the south of England thousands of years ago has undertaken by scientists and archaeologists.

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