Celtic Myth Show News

Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside

Category: Arts (Page 1 of 4)

“The Detectorists” inspire find of Medieval Manx Ring

Mr Graham discovers the ring in a field - Treasure Hunter
Mr Graham discovers the ring in a field

A silver medieval ring thought to be up to 600 years old has been unearthed by a man who took up metal detecting after watching The Detectorists, a TV sitcom reports the BBC.

The gold-gilded ring was found by Gordon Graham in a field in the north of the Isle of Man. Archaeologists believe the piece, which is engraved with geometric shapes, dates from between 1400 and 1500 AD.

An inquest hearing at Douglas Courthouse declared the ring can be officially classed as treasure. Allison Fox, a curator of archaeology at Manx National Heritage, said it may date back to the time when the first Manx laws were written, in the 1400s.

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Northumberlandia, the Lady of the North

Northumberlandia - Lady of the North, Earth Sculpture
Northumberlandia, Lady of the North

Northumberlandia (the “Lady of the North”) is a huge land sculpture in the shape of a reclining female figure, which was completed in 2012, near Cramlington, Northumberland, northern England.

Made of 1.5 million tonnes of earth from neighbouring Shotton Surface Mine, it is 34 metres (112 feet) high and 400 metres (1,300 feet) long, set in a 19 hectares (47 acres) public park. Its creators claim that it is the largest land sculpture in female form in the world.

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Another Writer’s Journey – Gary’s Little Biographical Story

ManonBeachPlease accept my apologies for writing about myself. I generally try and avoid this as I feel I am nowhere near as important as the stories I tell (and those that we tell as far as the Celtic Myth Podshow is concerned). That having been said, let’s plunge on in!

When I moved from Primary School to Secondary school (after the now legendary 11+ examination), one of my favourite lessons was the English class. At 11 years old I was far too young to understand much about Grammar or story/poem analysis, but I loved the act of creation involved in summoning imagery and meaning from words. Plain and simple words that when strung together could create pictures in my mind and feelings in my chest.

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Between Kettles and Cooking Spits at the Celtic Museum in Hochdorf

"Between Kettles and Cooking-spits" - Nutrition with the Celts - Celtic Museum

“Between Kettles and Cooking-spits” – Nutrition with the Celts

From April 28 to September 2, 2018, the Celtic Museum Hochdorf / Enz is holding a special exhibition about Nutrition among the Celts called ‘Between Kettles and Cooking Spits’.

If you believe Greek historians, then you would think that lavish feasts in the life of the Celts were the order of the day two thousand years ago. Even if only a few of these descriptions have been handed down, our image of ever-celebrating and miserable barbarians have left their mark on us to this day.

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Celtic Storytelling with Cath Little in Frome


Arthur & Guinevere - Celtic Storytellin in Frome
Frome’s storytelling club, Mr Rook’s Speak Easy continues its season of Celtic-themed evenings with a full-length performance from Welsh storyteller Cath Little on Thursday 29th March.

Ancient Celtic Storytelling Comes to Rook Lane Chapel

They have created a programme of shows based on Celtic mythology and folklore with Cardiff-based teller Cath Little telling the story of Enid and Geraint which comes from The Mabinogion, a collection of the oldest stories of Wales which go back to at least to the fourteenth century though parts may be older.

This enchanting retelling of an old British Wonder Tale is from the court of Arthur and Gwenhwyfar at Caerleon. It is a story that weaves between the known and the unknown worlds – a story that travels from the Forest of Dean to Cardiff, through the Hedge of Mists and all the way to the magical Apple Orchard of Annwn. Enid and Geraint meet and fall in love in a Cardiff long ago. But once they are married, their troubles begin. Together they travel through the dangerous world. They face monsters on their road through the dark woods and they battle with the doubts and fears in their own too human hearts.

Enid and Geraint by Cath Little at Rook Lane Chapel, Bath Street, Thursday 29 March at 7.30pm and is suitable for ages 14+. For more details find Mr Rook’s Speak Easy on Facebook.

First Harvest Lugh

Lugh and the Festival of Lughnasadh – “the binding duty of Lugh”

First Harvest Lugh

First Harvest

The great wheel of the year turns again on the evening of July 31st to August 1st, with the Celtic festival of Lughnasadh, “the binding duty of Lugh ” as the last in the cycle of the four seasons of the Celtic world.

This feast marks the beginning of Autumn or Fall, and the harvesting season – crops were harvested in August, fruit in September around the Autumn equinox and meat in October before Samhain/Halloween. The ‘first fruits’ of the harvest were crops.

Lugh Lámhfhada

Lugh Lammas fair Eastbourne

Lammas Fair – Eastbourne

Lughnasadh is named after the Celtic Sun God Lugh, ‘The Bright or Shining One’, God of the Harvest. He also presides over the arts and sciences, and as such he was called Lugh the Il-Dana, ‘Master of All Crafts’, or Samildanach, ‘he of the many gifts’. He was expert smith, craftsman, harpist, poet, sorcerer, physician, chess player and warrior.

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Portarlington Warriors - Australian Celtic Festival

Australian Celtic festival at Portarlington brings in 15,000 visitors

Irish Dance - Australian Celtic FestivalThe Portarlington National Celtic Festival, near Geelong in Australia brought in over 15,000 visitors, with people traveling from as far as New Zealand and organisers have described it as the best one yet, reports the Geelong Advertiser.

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New light on the spread of Bell-Beaker pottery

Bell-beaker PotsHannah Devlin looks at a genome study that may explain the spread of bell-shaped pottery beakers across Europe 4,500 years ago in the latest episode of the Guardian’s Science Weekly podcast. Around 4,500 years ago, a craze for bell-shaped pottery beakers appears to have swept across what is now modern-day Europe. Archaeologists have unearthed the distinctive pots at sites from the Iberian peninsula to Ireland in the west and Poland in the east. They appear in Britain at around the same time as Stonehenge was built.

Bell-Beaker pottery spread from Poland to Ireland

The pots have been dug up in Ireland, Poland, and Britain (where the bell-beakers arrived around the same time as Stonehenge was going up.) The “fad” has caused much disagreement among archaeologists: Did this style spread from one settlement to another, “like prehistoric fidget spinners”? Or did the bell-beaker people arrive all at once via mass migration or invasion? A new study of ancient genomes is beginning to answer that question.

Bronze Age fashion or mass migration?

The artefacts are linked to what is known as the Bell-Beaker culture. Archaeologists have been in disagreement about whether the spread of the beakers signified a Bronze Age fashion that was passed from one settlement to another, like prehistoric fidget spinners, or whether there was a mass migration – or even invasion – of beaker folk?

This question has been impossible to answer by studying artefacts alone, but now a major ancient-genome study has begun to shed some light on the mystery.

To discuss ancient Europe, genetics and the beaker folk, Hannah Devlin is joined by Ben Roberts, an archaeologist at the University of Durham.

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New Episode SP43 Sussex Celts, Fairies & Folklore

Folklore, Fairies, Cold Iron of Sussex and Puck of Pook’s Hill

SP43 Episode Cover - Sussex Celts, Fairies & FolkloreThis is our biggest show ever! A real MONSTER of a show with an excerpt from the fascinating book, British Witch Legends of Sussex which you can get hold of from the publisher Country Books, a great story by Rudyard Kipling all about that tricky Fey, Puck and six pieces of great Fairy-inspired music. It’s all topped off by two poems – including one poem read by our 9-year old Grand-daughter, Amielia!

Running Order:

We hope you enjoy it!

Gary & Ruthie x x x

Released: 1st May 2017, 1hr 51m

It’s always great to hear from you! Email garyandruth@celticmythpodshow.com, or call us using Speakpipe

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Helpers needed for Castell Henllys Iron Age village

Castell Henllys Iron Age Village will be opening its doors on Saturday (March 11) in a bid to form a new volunteer group that will help care for the unique heritage site reports the Milford Mercury.

An open afternoon will begin at 2pm to welcome those who are interested in volunteering some of their time and expertise to support the prehistoric site, which is owned and run by the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority.

Taking part in events at Castell Henllys

Castell Henllys Manager, Jenn Jones said:

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