Celtic Myth Show News

Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside

Category: The Sidhe

New Episode SP43 Sussex Celts, Fairies & Folklore

Folklore, Fairies, Cold Iron of Sussex and Puck of Pook’s Hill

SP43 Episode Cover - Sussex Celts, Fairies & FolkloreThis is our biggest show ever! A real MONSTER of a show with an excerpt from the fascinating book, British Witch Legends of Sussex which you can get hold of from the publisher Country Books, a great story by Rudyard Kipling all about that tricky Fey, Puck and six pieces of great Fairy-inspired music. It’s all topped off by two poems – including one poem read by our 9-year old Grand-daughter, Amielia!

Running Order:

We hope you enjoy it!

Gary & Ruthie x x x

Released: 1st May 2017, 1hr 51m

It’s always great to hear from you! Email garyandruth@celticmythpodshow.com, or call us using Speakpipe

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Daoine Sidhe - Irish Sidhe: Their Kin and Folklore

Irish Sidhe: Their Kin and Folklore

The Irish Sidhe, relatives of Arial and Puck have a weird attractiveness for the student of Irish folklore, for many reasons and especially because the traditions connected with them explain almost all those superstitious peculiarities which are observable among the Irish people.

It is the duty of the poet to express in rhythmical periods the aerial origin of what are sometimes called `those superstitions of the Irish,’ but for us it is only left to place before our readers in round everyday prose some few of the countless happy and poetic traits peculiar to our Irish Sidhe.

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Scathach from The Feminine in Early Irish Myth and Legend article

The Feminine in Early Irish Myth and Legend


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In early Irish mythology and legend, the feminine is quite dominant in the otherworld as well as on earth.

The land of Ireland and features of its landscape such as mountains, rivers and lakes were frequently associated with goddesses and other supernatural females.

Early Irish deities did not have specialised areas of influence like those of the Greeks and Romans, for instance.

The same Irish goddess could be a young woman or a hag, a mother or a virgin, a warrior or a seductive temptress, depending on the occasion.

In mythology, it was Ériu who gave her name to Ireland but the names of her two sister goddesses Banba and Fodla were also used.

Another trio of sister goddesses were all called Brigid and they were patrons of fertility, healing, smiths and poetry. They presided over a perpetual fire and the spring festival of Imbolc.

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Titania - A Midsummer Night's Dream film with fairies from folklore

A Midsummer Night’s Dream film with fairies from folklore


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The BBC is going to show a brand new interpretation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the end of May. It is going to feature the full effects resources of the Dr. Who team and some amazing CGI. The fairies (as you can see above) are not the wee, quaint little Victorian creatures of puff and silk that we may have previously seen. They are eldritch warriors and amoral lovers – and that is pretty much in line with how they were seen in Folklore!

Russel T. Davis, famous for his work on Doctor Who, has written a “bold and accessible” version of the Shakespearean play that may offend some of the Bard’s purist fans. Working alongside the special effects team responsible for Dr. Who, the team have put together some fairies that are quite disturbing and full of passions. This idea is much closer to traditional stories of fairy-lore, in which fairies are often quite capricious and violent.

When asked how he thought the purists would react, Russel said:

They will be perfectly happy. To be a Shakespeare purist means you’re in love with imagination and drama and truth and fun and honesty.

Really only idiots might have a problem with that. That’s what plays do they reinvent themselves constantly, for every generation, the next generation will do a new one and this is how they are meant to be done.

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The Midwife and the Fair Folk


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A long time ago, there lived a woman in a tidy little cottage tucked away between two hills. She was well known in those parts for being skilled in the art of midwifery, having helped in the delivery of just about every child within a day’s walk of her little cottage.

One night she was just getting ready to go to bed when she heard a knock on the door. She opened the door but saw nothing but the faint glimmer of a lantern on the roadway, perhaps a late night traveller making for the warmth and comfort of the village inn. She was about to close the door when the person with the lantern called out, imploring her to throw on her coat and follow him, for his wife was in labour and needed assistance.

She hesitated at this request, for it was dark and cold outside, but she shouted at him to wait and went to fetch her coat and bag. She followed him down the road and past the annagh, or cut-away bog, and down into the wood. The man kept up a blistering pace, close enough for her to walk by the light of the lantern but too far away to get a proper view of him.

The Midwife enters the Fairy Mound

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Pagan Portals: Irish Paganism by Morgan Daimler


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Once in a Blue Moon a book comes along that truly opens your eyes. Pagan Portals: Irish Paganism by Morgan Daimler and published by Moon Books is just such a book. It is a short book that covers a lot of ground in explaining Irish Reconstructionist Polytheism with one foot firmly planted in solid research and the other in personal spiritual experience. Celtic Reconstructionism (or C.R.) is one of those “hot potatoes” in modern neo-pagan circles with heated arguments and misunderstandings being tossed back and forth with great passion. This book is one of the few books on the subject that faces these issues head-on and stands out as a well-thought out, well-written and cooling breeze that makes the subject clear, vibrant and exciting. As far as we are aware this may be the first introduction and reference work for reconstructing Irish Paganism as a modern day study and practice.

The author, Morgan Daimler, is renowned as both a scholar of Old Irish and the ancient Irish texts as well as a modern priestess and devotee of the Irish Gods. Her relationships with the Morrigan, Brighid and the Sidhe (the Fairy Folk) have lead her to write excellent introductory texts on each (see the links below) and this book is a very informative introduction to the world of Irish Paganism. Morgan Daimler has given us an excellent, honest approach to reconstructing Irish Paganism, dispelling common misconceptions and explaining the path in simple easy-to-read terms.

So What Is Reconstructionism?

In the words of the author:

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