Celtic Myth Show News

Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside

Category: Irish History (Page 1 of 2)

Brigid’s Blessings on the Celtic Fire Festival of Imbolc

On Imbolc Eve Irish and Scottish women would clean and prepare their household for Brigid’s blessings during the night. Brigid was said to visit virtuous households and bring Imbolc blessings to the inhabitants. In some places in Ireland and Scotland it was a tradition to open all the doors and windows in the home and for the women of the house to stand at the threshold in order to recieve Brigid’s blessings. After being invited into the house a bed would often be made for her, and a wand or stick laid on the bed or close by.

Imbolc is dedicated to Saint Brigid; a major figure in the early Irish Church who predates the Saint to a pan-celtic pagan goddess of the same name. The festival which celebrates winter’s end, the onset of spring, and the start of the agricutural year is thought to be linked with Brigid in her role as a fertility goddess.

Read More

Imbolc Folklore, Rites and Traditions

Imbolc (Imbolg) the festival marking the beginning of spring has been celebrated since ancient times and the Imbolc folklore that has developed over the years is fascinating. It is a Cross Quarter Day, midpoint between the Winter Solstice and the Spring Equinox. It can fall between the 2nd & 7th of February when calculated as the mid point between the astronomical Winter Solstice and the astronomical Spring Equinox.

Cross quarter days were traditionally when leasehold payments and rents for land and premises were paid, and on these days people had a little more freedom to celebrate and mark the changing seasons.

In some places in Ireland and Scotland, all work ceased on the feast and devotions at holy wells took place instead.

Read More

Update on the Drumclay Crannog excavation

A crannog is an artificial island usually built in lakes, rivers and estuarine waters of Scotland and Ireland. Crannogs were widespread in Ireland with an estimated 1200 examples. However, the Drumclay Crannog, which is an artificial island built in a lake, is the first of its type to be excavated in the North of Ireland since 1870.

The site of the crannog at Drumclay in Co. Fermanagh has been known to archaeologists since the nineteenth century. The plans for the A32 link road originally envisaged bridging the site, allowing it to be preserved in situ. The plans were changed during the course of road construction and excavation began, directed initially by Declan Hurl and subsequently by Dr Nora Bermingham.

Read More

Bonfire

Oíche Shamhna Feast – An Introduction to Irish Iron Age Food

Bonfire - Iron Age Food

As a Págánacht each holy day is a time to reflect on our Iron Age ancestors and what their lives may have been like when they sat around their hearth or bonfire and celebrated their sacred times of the season.

The Iron Age Irish (700 BCE – 400CE) didn’t have the luxuries of the modern kitchen with the ceramic top stove and built in microwaves. Much of their time was spent out amongst the rest of their tribes, partaking in a three day festival of celebration and preparation for the new season. In the time of Samhain preparation was particularly important because they were at the end of the harvest period and entering the winter where food needed to be stored and cattle slaughtered for meat that would be salted and kept to sustain them through the winter.

Today, we do have the many modern luxuries afforded us by the technology we are blessed to have. There are some that may choose to celebrate this time in the way the ancestors did by breaking out their hearth fire and their cauldrons to cook. I have all the respect in the world for that practice and hope to one day be able to do it myself, but as a practical pagan in a modern world, that isn’t always feasible. My modern conveniences make my busy life much easier and I love my slow cooker, microwave and stove, so what can I do to truly connect to this time of year in a way my ancestors did? The simple answer? Food.

Read More

Irusan - King of Cats

The King of Cats and Seanchan the Bard

King of the Cats

King of Cats

There is a legend preserved in Ossianic tradition of the encounter between Seanchan, the celebrated chief poet of Ireland, and the King of Cats, who dwelt in a cave near Clonmacnoise.

In ancient Ireland the men of learning were esteemed beyond all other classes; all the great ollaves and professors and poets held the very highest social position, and took precedence of the nobles, and ranked next to royalty.

The leading men amongst them lived luxuriously in the great Bardic House; and when they went abroad through the country they travelled with a train of minor bards, fifty or more, and were entertained and accommodated free of cost by the kings and chiefs, who considered themselves highly honoured by the presence of so distinguished a company at their court.

Read More

Ripe Corn at Lughnasadh Harvest

The Celtic Fire Festival of Lughnasadh

Ripe Corn at Lughnasadh Harvest

Ripe Corn at Harvest

Lughnasadh or Lughnasa (pronounced LOO-nə-sə) Irish: Lúnasa; Scottish Gaelic: Lùnastal; Manx: Luanistyn) is a Celtic festival marking the beginning of the harvest season that was historically observed throughout Ireland, Scotland, and the Isle of Man. Traditionally it was held on July 31 – August 1, or approximately halfway between the summer solstice and autumn equinox. Lughnasadh is one of the four Celtic seasonal festivals; along with Samhain, Imbolc, and Beltane. It corresponds to other European harvest festivals, such as the English Lammas.

Lugh

Lugh

The festival is named after the god Lugh, and involved great gatherings that included religious ceremonies, ritual athletic contests (most notably the Tailteann Games), feasting, matchmaking, and trading. There were also visits to holy wells.

Lughnasadh customs persisted widely until the twentieth century. The custom of climbing hills and mountains at Lughnasadh has survived in some areas, although it has been re-cast as a Christian pilgrimage. Since the latter twentieth century, Celtic neopagans have observed Lughnasadh, or something based on it, as a religious holiday. In some places, elements of the festival have been revived as a cultural event.

Read More

Earth Goddess

Reigniting the Divine Feminine through Celtic Stories and Traditions


Latest Episode!

The Ancient Practice of Marrying the Land

Earth Goddess - Divine Feminine

Earth Goddess

The native pre-Christian mythology of the Celtic nations which stretch along the Western Atlantic seaboard of Europe is highly women – centred. In our oldest stories, the creative, generative essence of the universe was female, not male; the Divine Feminine represented the spiritual and moral axis of the world, and the power of men was predominantly social.

But the Celtic divine female was a long way from the remote, transcendent sky-deities we’ve grown used to in recent centuries here in the West: she had one foot in the Otherworld for sure, but she was firmly grounded and deeply rooted in place, indivisible from her distinctive, haunting landscapes.

Read More

Damn Slaugh, a Dark Fairy - from the Biddy Early – Ireland’s magical lady from Clare article

Biddy Early – Ireland’s magical lady from Clare


Latest Episode!

Bridget Ellen Early (known as Biddy Early) was a traditional Irish herbalist who helped her neighbours. She acted against the wishes of the local tenant farmer landlords and Catholic priests and was accused of witchcraft. Born in 1798 in Faha, Kilanena, Biddy O’Connor was the daughter of a poor farming family. At sixteen, she was sent to Feakle to work as a servant girl and later to Kilbarron to work for a doctor Dunne. It was necessary for Biddy to go into service at such a young age so as to help her family survive in such hard times.

It was in Kilbarron that she married one Pat O’Malley, and the couple had one child, a daughter. Pat was to die however after a few short years of marriage.
Her second husband was a Tom Flannery from Carrowroe, who sadly died when their only child Tom was only eight years old.

First Story of Biddy Early’s Magical Powers

It was about the time of this husband’s death that the first story of Biddy’s magical powers occurs. Biddy being unable to pay the rent to the local landlord because of her husbands’ death and the expense of rearing her young son, was served with an eviction notice.

Read More

The Bear Bone Cave - "Bear Bone Shows Humans Populated Ireland 2500 Years Earlier Than Realised"

Bear Bone Shows Humans Populated Ireland 2500 Years Earlier Than Realised


Latest Episode!

A remarkable archaeological discovery in a Co. Clare cave has pushed back the date of human existence in Ireland by 2,500 years. This discovery re-writes Irish archaeology and adds an entirely new chapter to human colonisation of the island – moving Ireland’s story into a new era.

Radiocarbon dating of a butchered brown bear bone, which had been stored in a cardboard box at the National Museum of Ireland for almost 100 years, has established that humans were on the island of Ireland some 12,500 years ago –2,500 earlier than previously believed reports Colm for Irish Archaeology.

Read More

St. Patrick's Day - http://roble.pntic.mec.es/ncos0003/stpatrickjquizmultiplechoiceimage.htm

Saint Patrick’s Life – the facts and the stories


Latest Episode!

Saint Patrick (ca. 390-460) is revered as patron of Ireland and, of course, he has come to be associated with parades and a lot of mischief associated with alcohol. No one would prohibit the Irish their day. Mayor Richard Daley used to say,

in Chicago on St. Patrick’s Day, everyone is Irish or wishes they were.

But let’s leave some of that malarkey aside as unworthy of his dignity. In lives of the saints, Patrick is called the Enlightener of Ireland and we are right to praise his memory says Father Gabriel Rochelle in the Las Cruces Sun-News.

But was Saint Patrick Irish?

Read More

Page 1 of 2

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén