Celtic Myth Show News

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Category: Bronze Age (Page 1 of 3)

Bronze Age Round House at Must Farm

Must Farm will be in list of Top Historical Sites

Final press visit to Must Farm bronze age ssite EMN-160713-130720009

Final press visit to Must Farm bronze age ssite EMN-160713-130720009

A prehistoric site in Whittlesey has been named as one of the 100 sites which best represent history in England reports Petersboroough Today. Bronze age settlement Must Farm, which saw perfectly preserved 3,000 year-old round houses discovered in a clay pit, has been selected in the A History of England in 100 Places campaign.

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Major housing development halted due to massive late Iron Age archaeological find

Remains of a prehistoric and late Iron Age settlement near North Petherton in Somerset have halted a major housing development. Archaeologists have discovered a series of 18 trenches dating back to Triassic, late Iron Age and early Roman periods on land off Newton Road earmarked for 140 homes.

Sedgemoor District Council turned down the plan due to a lack of information that

“the development would not have a significant adverse impact on the surrounding archaeology.”

Gladman Developments, which is behind the proposal, has appealed the decision and a five-day planning inquiry will be heard at the council’s headquarters starting on March 20.

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Aberdeen dig reveals 15,000 year-old Scottish artefacts

Artefacts dug up during excavations on the Aberdeen bypass have revealed glimpses into the last 15,000 years in the North-east – and raised questions over the area’s past.

A number of “fascinating discoveries” have been uncovered during archaeological works carried out during the construction of the project. These have included Roman bread ovens, prehistoric roundhouses and a cremation complex.

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The Mystery of Silbury Hill revealed (Repost)

Silbury Hill

Silbury Hill

Silbury Hill is the largest prehistoric man-made mound in Europe. It was built over 4,000 years ago in the Neolithic period. Back in 2008, we posted that The Guardian had announced that works on the Hill to stop it collapsing had been completed. The article below has been recovered for your interest after it was lost in a database crash 2 years ago. On 29 May 2000 a hole unexpectedly appeared on the top of Silbury Hill. A shaft had become open to a depth of 14 metres. Despite attempts to safeguard it, in December the top collapsed to leave a large crater, damaging important archaeological deposits.

Silbury is part of the Avebury World Heritage Site, the monument’s purpose and significance for prehistoric people remains unknown. The secret of Silbury Hill, the most enigmatic prehistoric monument in Europe, isn’t the monument but the monumental effort which went into building it, according to the archaeologist who has spent most of the last year slipping around on wet chalk deep in the heart of the hill.

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Bronze Age Boat built at Falmouth in Cornwall using traditional Celtic methods

A Bronze Age boat was launched in Falmouth on 6 March as part of an archaeological experiment being carried out by the National Maritime Museum Cornwall and the University of Exeter.

The 4000-year-old, 50ft long, five tonne prehistoric boat has been reconstructed by a team of volunteers, led by shipwright Brian Cumby. His team have spent the last year building the craft out of two massive oak logs using replica methods and tools, such as bronze-headed axes.

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New light on the spread of Bell-Beaker pottery

Bell-beaker PotsHannah Devlin looks at a genome study that may explain the spread of bell-shaped pottery beakers across Europe 4,500 years ago in the latest episode of the Guardian’s Science Weekly podcast. Around 4,500 years ago, a craze for bell-shaped pottery beakers appears to have swept across what is now modern-day Europe. Archaeologists have unearthed the distinctive pots at sites from the Iberian peninsula to Ireland in the west and Poland in the east. They appear in Britain at around the same time as Stonehenge was built.

Bell-Beaker pottery spread from Poland to Ireland

The pots have been dug up in Ireland, Poland, and Britain (where the bell-beakers arrived around the same time as Stonehenge was going up.) The “fad” has caused much disagreement among archaeologists: Did this style spread from one settlement to another, “like prehistoric fidget spinners”? Or did the bell-beaker people arrive all at once via mass migration or invasion? A new study of ancient genomes is beginning to answer that question.

Bronze Age fashion or mass migration?

The artefacts are linked to what is known as the Bell-Beaker culture. Archaeologists have been in disagreement about whether the spread of the beakers signified a Bronze Age fashion that was passed from one settlement to another, like prehistoric fidget spinners, or whether there was a mass migration – or even invasion – of beaker folk?

This question has been impossible to answer by studying artefacts alone, but now a major ancient-genome study has begun to shed some light on the mystery.

To discuss ancient Europe, genetics and the beaker folk, Hannah Devlin is joined by Ben Roberts, an archaeologist at the University of Durham.

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First multi-chamber Dolmen found in Israel

A rare megalithic structure, dating back 4,000 years, has been discovered at the Shamir Dolmen Field on the western foothills of the Golan Heights reports Sci-News. The newly-discovered megalithic stone structure is a unique, monumental, multi-chambered dolmen: a central chamber roofed by a gigantic engraved capstone and surrounded by a giant tumulus (stone heap) into which at least four additional sub-chambers were built.

First reported Multi-Dolmen or multi-chamber Dolmen in Levant

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Bronze Age Ava reveals medicinal plants in Ancient Scotland

In 1987, a team of archaeologists unearthed a Bronze Age grave in Achavanich, an area in the county of Caithness, Scotland. Inside the grave, they found the remains of a young woman. They called her Ava, after the place where she lived some 4,000 years ago.

As Steven McKenzie reports for the BBC, archaeologist Maya Hoole has been leading a long-term research project into the site, hoping to uncover details about Ava’s life. Most recently, Hoole and her fellow researchers identified an array of pollens that clung to a clay beaker found inside Ava’s grave. These pollens suggest that Ava lived in a lush, forested region that was very different to the treeless landscape stretching across the area today.

Bronze Age Pollens found in Beaker

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Significant Bronze Age weapons hoard found in Scotland

A gold-decorated Late Bronze Age spearhead and other artefacts uncovered during an Angus excavation have been hailed as “the find of a lifetime” reported the BBC earlier this year.

The weapon was discovered during an archaeological evaluation on land being developed into council football pitches at Balmachie in Carnoustie.

The spearhead was found beside a bronze sword, pin and scabbard fittings. It is one of only a handful of gold-decorated bronze spearheads ever found in Britain and Ireland.

The discovery was made in a pit close to a Late Bronze Age settlement that was excavated by GUARD Archaeology on behalf of Angus Council.

Internationally Significant Bronze Age Weapons

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Updates on the early Bronze Age Dartmoor Princess finds

The excavation of a prehistoric cremation burial discovered within a cist at Whitehorse Hill on northern Dartmoor has revealed nationally important remains which have captured the interest of experts from all over the country. This was the first excavation of a burial site on Dartmoor for 100 years.

This is now considered to be the most important assemblage of prehistoric grave goods ever recovered from Dartmoor and indeed from the whole of the South West of England. The survival of the organic remains is also seen to be of international importance.

This individual, whose cremated remains were placed in a cist on this remote spot on Northern Dartmoor, over four thousand years ago, was apparently of some importance to the local community. Who was it, what was their gender, what type of animal hide was used to wrap the cremated remains? The answers to these and many other questions are part of this unfolding and fascinating story which hopefully will tell us much more about the lives of prehistoric people on Dartmoor and the landscape they lived in. 

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