Celtic Myth Show News

Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside

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Is this one of the four islands of the Tuatha De Danaan?


Atlantis - Submerged undersea island

Prehistoric land under the sea

The Tuatha Dé Danann are known in Celtic mythology are the children of the goddess Danu, and are the Irish gods, progenitors of the Sidhe, the Fey folk who retreated to dwell uner the Mounds, that some call the Hollow Hills. In the Lebor Gabála Érenn they are said to have originated from four magical islands to the north of Ireland. In Lady Gregory’s translation we read:

It was from the north they came; and in the place they came from they had four cities, where they fought their battle for learning: great Falias, and shining Gorias, and Finias, and rich Murias that lay to the south. And in those cities they had four wise men to teach their young men skill and knowledge and perfect wisdom: Senias in Murias; and Arias, the fair-haired poet, in Finias; and Urias of the noble nature in Gorias; and Morias in Falias itself.

It’s remarkable how close the mythological ‘history’ is to this recent discovery in the north Atlantic Sea. The following report comes from BBC Northern Ireland back in 2009.

It’s a landscape no human has even seen. And those who live right beside it had no idea it even existed. Deep below the sea, off the north coast of Northern Ireland, a dramatic geological mystery has been discovered.

Huge cliffs, vast basins and plateaus, a lake and even rivers have been found. But so far no-one is certain what caused them to end up like this deep under the sea. The discovery was made when the seabed was being surveyed to update old Admiralty charts, drawn up in the mid-1800s.

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14,000-year-old settlement and hunting kit found in Scotland – repost

Scotland’s oldest settlement, dating back 14,000 years, was near Biggar, in South Lanarkshire, archaeologists say. The site may have been a camp used by hunters following migrating herds of reindeer or wild horses across plains that are now covered by the North Sea.

Its discovery by the Biggar Archeology Group means humans have lived in Scotland for 3,000 years longer than previously thought. Until now the earliest evidence of human habitation in the country was at Cramond, near Edinburgh, which had been radiocarbon-dated to about 8400 BCE.

A large scattering of flints was first found in the field near Biggar a few years ago but the site was initially thought to be late Neolithic and was later classified as an Iron Age settlement after radiocarbon dating of charcoal found there. However, recent analysis of more of the flints revealed that they were from the end of the Upper Palaeolithic period, 14,000 years ago.

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Aberdeen dig reveals 15,000 year-old Scottish artefacts

Artefacts dug up during excavations on the Aberdeen bypass have revealed glimpses into the last 15,000 years in the North-east – and raised questions over the area’s past.

A number of “fascinating discoveries” have been uncovered during archaeological works carried out during the construction of the project. These have included Roman bread ovens, prehistoric roundhouses and a cremation complex.

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Beachy Head

The Beachy Head Lady in Iron Age Britain

Thanks to the wonderful Way Back machine, we have managed to recover another of the posts that we lost with our database crash. Please enjoy.

An exhibition exploring the origins of ancient skeletons in Sussex, including a woman from sub-Saharan Africa buried in Roman times, opened reported the BBC in Feb 2014. The face of the so-called Beachy Head Lady was recreated using craniofacial reconstruction.

Eastbourne Borough Council’s museum service was awarded a grant of £72,000 by the Heritage Lottery Fund for the Eastbourne Ancestors project. The aim was to identify the gender and age of each skeleton in its collection.

Detailed scientific analysis of more than 300 skeletons of people who lived in the south of England thousands of years ago has undertaken by scientists and archaeologists.

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Update on the proposed Stonehenge Tunnel

 

The Stonehenge Tunnel will have to be moved

Almost exactly a year ago, Chris Grayling MP, the Secretary of State for Transport, approved the construction of a tunnel under Stonehenge. The suggested route of the Stonehenge Tunnel was moved by 50 metres after protests by Archaeologists and Druids (Guardian). The BBC confirmed that the proposed new route would leave the view of the stones at the Winter Solstice unblocked (BBC).

But the Stonehenge Alliance and Campaign for Better Transport said the project needs a “complete re-think, not a minor tweak”. A spokeswoman said:

“The potential risk of loss of Stonehenge’s World Heritage Status casts shame upon our country and those responsible for caring for our heritage”

Time Team presenter Sir Tony Robinson also described the project as

“the most brutal intrusion into the Stone Age landscape ever”.

He has accused the Department for Transport of paying “no attention at all” to the importance of Stonehenge. Read on for a repost of the original article:

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The Mystery of Silbury Hill revealed (Repost)

Silbury Hill

Silbury Hill

Silbury Hill is the largest prehistoric man-made mound in Europe. It was built over 4,000 years ago in the Neolithic period. Back in 2008, we posted that The Guardian had announced that works on the Hill to stop it collapsing had been completed. The article below has been recovered for your interest after it was lost in a database crash 2 years ago. On 29 May 2000 a hole unexpectedly appeared on the top of Silbury Hill. A shaft had become open to a depth of 14 metres. Despite attempts to safeguard it, in December the top collapsed to leave a large crater, damaging important archaeological deposits.

Silbury is part of the Avebury World Heritage Site, the monument’s purpose and significance for prehistoric people remains unknown. The secret of Silbury Hill, the most enigmatic prehistoric monument in Europe, isn’t the monument but the monumental effort which went into building it, according to the archaeologist who has spent most of the last year slipping around on wet chalk deep in the heart of the hill.

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Bronze Age Boat built at Falmouth in Cornwall using traditional Celtic methods

A Bronze Age boat was launched in Falmouth on 6 March as part of an archaeological experiment being carried out by the National Maritime Museum Cornwall and the University of Exeter.

The 4000-year-old, 50ft long, five tonne prehistoric boat has been reconstructed by a team of volunteers, led by shipwright Brian Cumby. His team have spent the last year building the craft out of two massive oak logs using replica methods and tools, such as bronze-headed axes.

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An Update on the Rhynie Man Pictish site discoveries

Rhynie ManThe Centre for Scottish and Celtic Studies reported a seminar that took place in March of 2014. Dr. Gordon Noble (from Aberdeen University) spoke about recent excavation work involving the Rhynie Man site that we reported about in a previous news post. Dr Gordon Noble, discussed excavation work at Rhynie in Aberdeenshire. Rhynie is said to mean ‘a very royal place’ and Dr Noble suggested that the archaeological evidence was beginning to match with this.

A Complex landscape of Palisades and Timber Buildings

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Pictish Palace on Rhynie Man Pictish Stone site found in Aberdeenshire – Repost


Pictish Palace on Rhynie Man Pictish Stone site found in Aberdeenshire – Repost

We’ve managed to find one of our old News articles that had been lost after our database crash, so would like to bring it back to you. BBC Scotland reports that archaeologists excavating a field in Aberdeenshire where standing stones were found believe they have uncovered the entrance to a Pictish palace. The University of Aberdeen team is digging at a site where the so-called Rhynie Man stone was discovered in the 1970s.

The Rhynie Man Pictish Stone site

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First Harvest Lugh

Lugh and the Festival of Lughnasadh – “the binding duty of Lugh”

First Harvest Lugh

First Harvest

The great wheel of the year turns again on the evening of July 31st to August 1st, with the Celtic festival of Lughnasadh, “the binding duty of Lugh ” as the last in the cycle of the four seasons of the Celtic world.

This feast marks the beginning of Autumn or Fall, and the harvesting season – crops were harvested in August, fruit in September around the Autumn equinox and meat in October before Samhain/Halloween. The ‘first fruits’ of the harvest were crops.

Lugh Lámhfhada

Lugh Lammas fair Eastbourne

Lammas Fair – Eastbourne

Lughnasadh is named after the Celtic Sun God Lugh, ‘The Bright or Shining One’, God of the Harvest. He also presides over the arts and sciences, and as such he was called Lugh the Il-Dana, ‘Master of All Crafts’, or Samildanach, ‘he of the many gifts’. He was expert smith, craftsman, harpist, poet, sorcerer, physician, chess player and warrior.

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